UA-1688115-3

Red Line Riders Must Go ‘Green’ in May

CTA President Forrest Claypool outlines changes for Red Line riders when construction begins in May. The CTA announced its plans Thursday at a press conference at the Garfield Green Line stop. (Photo by Megan Ammer)

CTA President Forrest Claypool outlines changes for Red Line riders when construction begins in May. The CTA announced its plans Thursday at a press conference at the Garfield Green Line stop. (Photo by Megan Ammer)

Riders on the CTA Red Line will have to switch to Green Line trains starting May 19 when a section of the so-called Dan Ryan branch of the system will be closed for repairs.

The $425 million project will replace and rebuild Red Line tracks from Cermak-Chinatown to 95th/Dan Ryan. The project will take five months.

Terry Peterson, chairman of the Chicago Transit Board, said officials are starting prepare commuters now so they can make alternative plans before the construction starts later this spring.

“Time waits for no one,” he said. “Spring is rapidly approaching. As we move forward we will continue to keep the community informed both before and during the work.”

T. Forrest Claypool, president of the CTA, said the Red Line is the backbone of the system so the disruptions will be significant. One-third of all CTA customers use the Red Line, he said. The finished project will provide customers with a faster commute, by approximately 20, and will make trains more consistent overall, he said.

The project also will include repairs to stations.

Nancy Lipman, Chicago police commander in charge of transportation, said police will patrol shuttle bus stations and train stations where commuters are re-routed.

“Conditions will be monitored on a daily basis to ensure the safety of customers,” she said.

Red line trains will now be running on Green Line tracks to 63rd & Ashland. Shuttles will be bringing commuters to the Garfield Green Line stop where they will have free entry. The CTA has also teamed up with Metra to offer “bundle” packages for riders of both.

“Red Line South has been the ‘work horse’ of our system,” said Peterson, noting that it is the only part of the system that has seen a major decrease in ridership.

Megan Ammer and Sofia Spaniolo contributed to this story.

 

Posted by on February 22, 2013. Filed under Community, Editor's Choice, Transportation. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.